Best Memory Cards for Canon EOS R5

Canon’s flagship mirrorless camera has finally been released. So what better way to get the most out of the R5 than with the best memory card for the Canon EOS R5.

Canon EOS R5 Memory Card Recommendations

The Canon EOS R5 has two different memory card slots, one for SD cards and one CFexpress Type-B card slot.

First we’ll quickly note the differences of each card type.

  • CFexpress Type-B Cards: Faster cards that will support RAW 8K video capture with write speeds up to 1,480 MB/s. Let’s be honest this is what you want if you want to take full advantage of the R5’s power.
  • UHS-II SD Cards: Widely supported cards that support a max write speeds of 300 MB/s. Perfect for photos and most video features.

Best CFexpress memory cards for Canon EOS R5:

To get the most out of your Canon EOS R5 you’ll want to use a CFexpress memory card. These are some of the fastest cards that will support all of the high end features of the R5. These video features includes shooting 8K RAW and 4K 120FPS. While the Canon R5 can take RAW 45 megapixel photos at a high-speed of 20 FPS for a burst of 83 photos.

CFexpress cards can have a max write speed of 1,480 MB/s and a read speed of 1,700 MB/s.

The Sony Tough CFexpress Type-B card will let you use all the features of the R5 in a rugged body.

Sale
SONY Cfexpress Tough Memory Card
  • Ultra fast write speed at up to 1480 MB/s

And of course if you have CFexpress cards you’ll want a CFexpress Type-B reader. I recommend the ProGrade CFexpress Type-B reader it also has a slot for SD cards as well.

Best UHS-II SD memory cards for Canon EOS R5:

The SD card slot on the Canon R5 supports UHS-II SD cards. These have a max read and write speed of 300 MB/s which make them perfect for casual shooting or even moderate video users.

Using an SD card you won’t be able to shoot 8K RAW, 8K ALL-I, 4K 120FPS, 4K 60FPS ALL-I, and 8K time-lapse shooting. Additionally you will only be able to shoot 12 FPS photos and won’t be able to utilize the 20 FPS electronic shutter shooting.


In addition to using either type of memory card in the R5 you can also use one as a backup incase a card fails. So even if you plan on only using CFexpress cards it might be a good idea to invest in an SD card as a backup. Especially if you shoot commercial work or weddings.

For more information about write speeds on the Canon R5 check out the R5 manual.

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7 comments on “Best Memory Cards for Canon EOS R5”

  1. I am curious to know if I will be able to use my very expensive 256GB and 512GB XQD in my Canon R5 when it arrives at my door? I understand that the camera uses CFExpress cards but they as far as I can tell are almost identical.

    1. Based on a quick search I would say that the Canon R5 won’t work with XQD cards. The 1Dx Mark III also has a CFExpress Type B slot and doesn’t work with XQD cards. Sony appears to own the rights to XQD so I think Canon would have to pay to implement the connection. I hope this is helpful (I could be wrong too).

  2. You also need to consider sustained write speed and not the burst speeds which the manufacturers are a uoting. For each of the video bitrates, the card needs to support that as sustained (cards are in MBps, video rates in the manual are Bps). I’m sure the Sony, sandisk and lexar can, but for instance the prograde gold I do not believe will. As per the table you have, Canon has qualified some cards noting those that will and will not work with 8k

    1. Thanks Stu, I will look more into sustained speeds, I am on a Prograde Gold and 8K Raw is working for me but I haven’t recorded a long clip. Didn’t even think about sustained speeds, thank you!

    2. Hey Stu, you bring up a good point. Sustained writes are rated by the minimum sustained write speed, which is shown as v30, v60, or v90 on fast cards. These indicate the minimum sustained write speed in MB/s, and U3 such as on the SanDisk extreme pro cards means a minimum of 30 just like v30. The Sony tough cards are v90, as are the Lexar pro 2000x, and the ProGrade 300MB/s cards. The SanDisk extreme pro cards are actually rather slow on their minimum write speed and would not be up to par for all the recording settings mentioned in the chart from Canon. Thanks for bringing it up!

  3. Those Sony Tough cards are the very first cards that misfunctioned in my camera. Sony is going to exchange my cards (128GB Tough SD cards) but I’m waiting for two months now. I know these are CFexpress cards and not SD but I’m dissapointed in a company that takes months to return some faulty cards.

  4. Hey Stu, you bring up a good point. Sustained writes are rated by the minimum sustained write speed, which is shown as v30, v60, or v90 on fast cards. These indicate the minimum sustained write speed in MB/s, and U3 such as on the SanDisk extreme pro cards means a minimum of 30 just like v30. The Sony tough cards are v90, as are the Lexar pro 2000x, and the ProGrade 300MB/s cards. The SanDisk extreme pro cards are actually rather slow on their minimum write speed and would not be up to par for all the recording settings mentioned in the chart from Canon. Thanks for bringing it up!